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WEDGWOOD COMES TO US ON YOUTUBE

Here is a great YouTube video with history and current information by our friend and Wedgwood Museum Director, Gaye Blake-Roberts. Enjoy

QUICKIE NEWS SPLASH ~ TIME SENSITIVE NEWS


INVENTORY CLEARANCE SALE -25% OFF ALL BONE CHINA ITEMS, PRODUCT #S IN 600 SERIES - BUY CHINA!!


Opening a brand new book that still smells of ink is such a sublime experience, almost as good as that musty smell of an old book reminding us of its history!

Check out our newly listed items on the WEBSITE where things are always changing. AT ALEXIS ANTIQUES ANNEX WE'VE ADDED MORE NON-WEDGWOOD ENGLISH CERAMICS, TO INCLUDE SOME ABSOUTELY ADORABLE ADAMS Titian Ware VERNACULAR HAND PAINTED PLATES. CHECK THEM OUT! We've added lots of new jasperware too, blue and green AND some excellent black basalt wares!


VISITING OUR BLOG

CLICK THE TITLE OF MANY OF THE BLOG POSTS TO GO DIRECTLY TO THE IMAGE OR TEXT OF THE SUBJECT MATTER. BE SURE TO VISIT OUR WEBSITE OFTEN AS THINGS ARE ALWAYS CHANGING. CLICKING THE PHOTO OF THE FEATURE OF THE WEEK WILL TAKE YOU TO ITS LISTING ON OUR SITE. THANK YOU FOR READING!







Wednesday, January 27, 2016

JANUARY 29 IS KANSAS DAY - CHECK OUT A WEDGWOOD KANSAS DAR PLATE

We currently have a very nice Wedgwood plate made for the KANSAS SOCIETY, Daugthers of the American Revolution.  See it at http://www.alexisantiques.com/browse/view.php?item=WW770-13
It's an unusual commemorative in the DAR series of plates.  It memorializes the visit in 1937 of the State Regent, Mrs. Becker, to the KSDAR State Conference in Wichita.  It's in gorgeous condition and would be a great addition to the collection of a Kansas daughter.  Mention you saw it here for free shipping in the USA. And Happy Kansas Day to all our Kansas friends and clients!
 

WHAT'S OLD IS NEW AGAIN IN THE WORLD OF WEDGWOOD DESIGN

WHAT'S OLD IS NEW AGAIN IN THE WEDGWOOD WORLD! Thanks to our friend Lord Pulford in Scotland and to The UK Telegraph we have learned of a new trend, but really it's not new. In the 1970s and 80s I decorated several dining rooms with fabric draperies and wallcoverings in gorgeous Wedgwood patterns, licensed to a famed wallcovering firm. They eventually disappeared but now check out http://www.blendworth.co.uk/wedgwood/ for some beautiful new fabrics and wallpapers reminiscent of the historic beauty of Wedgwood classical looks. (click order samples tab to see all the various patterns on offer.)

 And for a better overview of the subject of reviving older products and styles, go here to read in depth about the renaissance of home and fashion styles from the past. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/luxury/design/98075/meet-the-design-czars-turning-homeware-brands-around.html
The classic beauty of historic Wedgwood will live on in these new trends as the young forward-thinking designers look back to history for their inspiration.  What's old is indeed new again.  For a sample of the earlier version of drapery fabric, in this case the Columbia bone china pattern, see http://www.alexisantiques.com/browse/view.php?item=WW071
and yet another, albeit newer, fun home fashion accessory which matches the Wedgwood Grand Gourmet series of wine and champagne label plates, see http://www.alexisantiques.com/browse/view.php?item=WW070

Home fashion based on exquisite china patterns of old is a re-emerging trend these days; let's all be glad the younger designers are looking to the past both for marketing ideas as well as design creativity and embrace their work!

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

STEPHEN FOSTER COLLINS MEMORIAL DAY and WEDGWOOD

American composer Stephen Collins died at the young age of 37 on this date in 1864.  Here is what Wikipedia says about him in part:
"known as "the father of American music", was an American songwriter primarily known for his parlor and minstrel music. Foster wrote over 200 songs; among his best-known are "Oh! Susanna", "Camptown Races", "Old Folks at Home", "My Old Kentucky Home", "Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair", "Old Black Joe", and "Beautiful Dreamer". Many of his compositions remain popular more than 150 years after he wrote them. His compositions are thought to be autobiographical. He has been identified as "the most famous songwriter of the nineteenth century", and may be the most recognizable American composer in other countries. His compositions are sometimes referred to as "childhood songs" because they are included in the music curriculum of early education."

He is buried in Pittsburgh, and there is a Memorial Building on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh, which is shown in a 1959 Wedgwood Queensware college plate.  Check it out at www.collegeplates.com.  If you have connections to Pittsburgh or just love his music, this plate might be a nice addition to your Wedgwood or college plate collection!

Friday, July 17, 2015

NEWLY REVAMPED WEDGWOOD MUSEUM & CAMPUS OPENS TODAY!

The new Museum and Visitor Experience are opened as promised today!  Check it out here and then plan to go! We are!

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Newly renovated Barlaston Wedgwood site to reopen next month

The new Wedgwood campus with new exhibits, new displays, new activities, a new tea room and more is set to open on 17th July.  Formerly it was scheduled to open in May, but due to construction concerns that date was pushed up to next month.  Read the full article, courtesy of our ever-viligant Scottish friend Laird Pulford, who forwarded it to us today.  See the article here and thank you Sir P! 

Thursday, June 11, 2015

ANNOUNCING THE NEW WEDGWOOD BARLASTON EXPERIENCE

The opening day is coming closer, and the press releases are starting to pop up.  Here is one just found today, check it out.  Let's hope they are really ready to open mid-July as claimed.  Opening was already delayed once.  Enjoy reading about what we have to look forward to!



Wednesday, May 27, 2015

VICTORIAN TASTE, WEDGWOOD MAJOLICA & WILLIAM THE SILENT

Here from our friend Lord Anthony Pulford of Glencoe, Scotland, is another interesting article he has shared for our enjoyment.  Thank you Lord Anthony for your continuing interest in Wedgwood and Alexis Antiques, and for your thorough and entertaining research!  Photos courtesy of the author. 


 VICTORIAN TASTE
                                                                     ---------------------

  The portrait medallion of William The Silent, Prince of Orange (1533-1584) taken from an engraving based on the painting by Michiel Mierevelt was first listed in the Wedgwood catalogue of 1788 and has been reproduced a number of times.

  The jasperware example is marked WEDGWOOD only and dates from c1860 but, by the 1870's, the Victorian taste for brightly coloured and decorative items had largely replaced the severe lines of classic jasperware.  The second example, of the same subject, dating from c1875 and also marked WEDGWOOD only, reflects this change in taste and is produced in the majolica body.  So popular did this form of decoration prove that, throughout the 1870's, almost every class of ware was made in majolica and, reportedly, outnumbered all other ornamental wares.

  By the 1880's, the number of paintresses employed had almost doubled, mainly with girls recruited from the government art schools.  They showed great skill in painting the moulded details of the piece although the same may not be said of the mould-maker who obviously had some difficulty applying the inscription.

  Majolica continued to be produced at Etruria into the 20th Century but output declined partly in response to government pressure to reduce the high lead content of the glazes used in production.

Monday, May 11, 2015

WWRD acquired by famed FISKARS - PRESS RELEASE

We've all been waiting to see who would buy the WWRD holdings, which include Waterford and Wedgwood of course, and now the news is out.  GO HERE to see the Press Release.  Hopefully this will bring a worldwide market for great British products, time will certainly tell!  Also, we have just learned that the predicted opening of the new Wedgwood compound at Barlaston has been delayed past the original expected date.  More on that as we hear details.

Thursday, February 26, 2015

WEDGWOOD INSTITUTE, BURSLEM, REFURBISHMENT BEGINS



Here is an excellent article with beautiful photos from the folks at BBC illustrating the beginning of the long-awaited refurbishment and repurposing of the well-known and loved Wedgwood Institute.  We have watched this story with great interest for a long time.  The building has many connections to Wedgwood, the man and the company, the city of Burslem, the arts in Staffordshire and much more since its original construction in 1869.  Let's hope the arts community will welcome this new venue and use it well.  Sarah Lewis, from English Heritage, said: "The Wedgwood Institute is one of the top 6% of listed buildings in the country for not only its architectural splendour but also the social history it embodies."

Sunday, December 14, 2014

Dr. Keith Mc Leod, educator and Wedgwood expert dies in Canada

The Wedgwood world-wide community has lost a great member recently.  Keith was a powerful force in the Wedgwood International Seminar for many years, directing our Seminars, making superb arrangements, encouraging collectors and editing and publishing the Seminar Proceedings for many years.  Here is the announcement received today from friend Lynn Miller, retired Curator at the Wedgwood Museum in Barlaston:

"I returned this afternoon from my mother's to a most unexpected email advising
me that Keith McLeod had died suddenly on fourth December. We knew he had been
ill for many years, and that recently he had to move into a home to receive care
and attention. As a gentleman who lived independently for so many
years, traveling the world and being an intrepid traveler, this must have been
tiresome for him. I understand that he was active until the end, and had been
traveling to hear a concert when he was taken ill, probably from a stroke, and
that he passed away in hospital.

His love of all things Wedgwood, and his support of the Museum and Wedgwood
International Seminar will long be remembered, and I know that his friends and
colleagues world wide will miss him greatly. I know I will."

Keith was a big help to me in preparing the two lectures I gave at WIS seminars for publication; his view of American university format for end-notes and mine were often at loggerheads, and he usually won because HE was the Editor!  He will indeed be missed. Thank you to Alan Erickson for forwarding this message. 
His obituary can be found here:

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/thestar/obituary.aspx?n=keith-mcleod-phd&pid=173456195&fhid=9911